Tag Archive | Astronomy

Michio Kaku on the Massive Mega Structure Found in Space

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AngelicView: I think this is big – coming from Dr. Michio Kaku – on the subject of the giant “alien” (I use that term loosely) megastructure found in space between the Kepler Telescope and a star. He says that there are great light fluctuations in this star, as if something massive is passing in front of the star. If it was a planet, he says that there would be a maximum of a 1% light fluctuation. But in this case the star light has been dropping 22%. Kaku says there is a colossal, humongous object of some kind blocking the star light.

He says that since it was first observed in 2009, they have ruled out everything else, and are left with the speculation of it being an alien mega structure.

See the video, below.

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The Holographic Universe Principle: What is & What Should Never be

Thanks To From Quarks to Quasars

Given all of the recent coverage on the radical idea that the universe is one massive hologram, we thought we would take a few minutes to delve into what that really means for us. Basically, the holographic universe principle suggests that we’re living in a simulated reality (different from the hypothesis that states we live in a computer simulation), where our physical world is nothing more than a detailed illusion. This illusion is actually projected by our brains, as energy fields are being decoded into the seemingly 3 dimensional universe we see around us. In a more speculative sense, the theory suggests that the entire universe can be seen as a two-dimensional information structure, which is “painted” on the cosmological horizon, such that the three dimensions (four, if you include time) we observe are only an effective description at macroscopic scales and at low energies.

“Our brain mathematically constructs objective reality by interpreting frequencies that are ultimately from another dimension, a deeper order of existence that is beyond both space and time” says David Bohm, who is the primary voice behind the holographic universe principle. (He certainly is not the only scientist that consider it a viable hypothesis. Brian Greene, author of “The Elegant Universe” is one of them.)  Bohm was dissatisfied with standard cosmological theories that couldn’t explain diverse phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics. He was also very interested in  understanding how they relate to the neuropathology of the brain.

So, in 1982, an experiment was conducted by a research team led by physicist Alain Aspect at the Institute of Theoretical And Applied Optics, in Paris. It was discovered that under certain conditions, subatomic particles (such as electrons) are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn’t matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart. Somehow the particles always seem to know what the other is doing. We now call this “quantum entanglement, and it’s one of the more baffling aspects of particle physics, mostly because the underlying theme appears to contradict Einstein’s theory of special relativity, which says NOTHING can travel faster than the speed of light. (including information)

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What Earth Objects are Visible from Space?

Thanks to Jolene at From Quarks to Quasars

It’s a myth that has persisted for years: the Great Wall of China is the only man-made object that you can see from space. Or even worse, that the Great Wall is the only feature that you can see from the Moon without assistance.

Even if you haven’t heard this myth, I’m sure you’ve often wondered what the Earth looks like from a distance. If neither of these things is true….well then, you should probably get out more.

Let’s tackle the more unbelievable statement first—seeing the Great Wall from the Moon. In fact, seeing the Great Wall from the Moon’s surface would be the same as seeing a human hair from 2 miles away (3.2 km). Unless you have a high-powered telescope, or eyesight that is out of this world,* you’re not going to be able to see such a tiny object.

Given the average distance of the Moon, some 238,000 miles from the Earth (383,000 km), a feature on our planet would have to be roughly 70 miles across (113 km) for the unaided human eye to be able to discern it from the surrounding landscape. At its widest, The Great Wall is a mere 30 feet (9.1m). So it’s not even close.

When asked what features are visible from the Moon, Apollo 12 astronaut Alan Bean stated, “The only thing you can see from the Moon is a beautiful sphere, mostly white, some blue and patches of yellow, and every once in a while some green vegetation. No man-made object is visible at this scale.”

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The Only Home We’ve Ever Known

“From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it’s different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

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Hubble Spots Azure Blue Planet

From Space Telescope .org

True Colour of Exoplanet Measured for the First Time

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have, for the first time, determined the true colour of a planet orbiting another star. If seen up close this planet, known as HD 189733b, would be a deep azure blue, reminiscent of Earth’s colour as seen from space.

But that’s where the similarities end. This “deep blue dot” is a huge gas giant orbiting very close to its host star. The planet’s atmosphere is scorching with a temperature of over 1000 degrees Celsius, and it rains glass, sideways, in howling 7000 kilometre-per-hour winds [1].

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Neil DeGrasse Tyson: Cosmic Perspective

Thanks to Natural History.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson explains how embracing cosmic realities can enlighten our view of human life.

Of all the sciences cultivated by mankind, Astronomy is acknowledged to be, and undoubtedly is, the most sublime, the most interesting, and the most useful. For, by knowledge derived from this science, not only the bulk of the Earth is discovered . . . but our very faculties are enlarged with the grandeur of the ideas it conveys, our minds exalted above [their] low contracted prejudices. —James Ferguson, Astronomy Explained Upon Sir Isaac Newton’s Principles, And Made Easy To Those Who Have Not Studied Mathematics (1757)

Long before anyone knew that the universe had a beginning, before we knew that the nearest large galaxy lies two and a half million light-years from Earth, before we knew how stars work or whether atoms exist, James Ferguson’s enthusiastic introduction to his favorite science rang true. Yet his words, apart from their eighteenth-century flourish, could have been written yesterday.

But who gets to think that way? Who gets to celebrate this cosmic view of life? Not the migrant farmworker. Not the sweatshop worker. Certainly not the homeless person rummaging through the trash for food. You need the luxury of time not spent on mere survival. You need to live in a nation whose government values the search to understand humanity’s place in the universe. You need a society in which intellectual pursuit can take you to the frontiers of discovery, and in which news of your discoveries can be routinely disseminated. By those measures, most citizens of industrialized nations do quite well.

Yet the cosmic view comes with a hidden cost. When I travel thousands of miles to spend a few moments in the fast-moving shadow of the Moon during a total solar eclipse, sometimes I lose sight of Earth.

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